Acceptance

I’ve always fit the definition of what you might call a ‘nerd’.

Math and the sciences were among my favorite subjects in high school, I was basically a teacher’s pet in my English classes, and it was probably easier to teach a fish to tap dance than to teach me any sort of sporting activity. It didn’t help that my older brother was a bit of a sports superstar, something various relatives never hesitated to remind me of, and which only pushed me further away from the ballpark. I’d much rather have my nose buried in a book.

Like any kid, I loved me my cartoons. Adulthood has done little to change my opinion of them, even if the spooky mysteries of Scooby Doo are laughable for the wrong reasons now. At some point, I discovered the world of comic books. I’m not entirely sure what led me down that path, but there I was. They were fun to read and a good way to pass the time; I never expected them to become a lifelong hobby.

As a child, I remember walking into my brother’s room as he and his friends were watching Batman (the Tim Burton film). It was near the climax, and I just remember this eerie looking guy in a black bat mask and outfit fighting a purple-suited clown. I was hooked right away. That image remained mostly forgotten until Batman Returns came out, and I was intrigued to find out more about this ‘Batman’ guy. He seemed quite alright.

My childhood love of fairy tales (I never got tired of reading Jack and the Beanstalk) instilled in me a lifelong love of the fantastical and the surreal, and set me on the path to being a sci-fi and fantasy junkie. I was glued to the TV on many an afternoon watching Star Trek and Lost in Space, and though I haven’t watched Star Wars (what?!), I’m very familiar with Star Wars trivia, almost as much as any diehard fan.

These were the foundations of my formative years. But, as I discovered growing up, such pursuits were looked down upon by the cool kids. Science fiction, fantasy, comic books. These were the domain of nerds and geeks, the weirdos that nobody invites to parties. Nobody wants to be a pariah, so I downplayed my interests to try and fit in. During early adulthood, I let the mask slip a bit, letting people know my interests, but I still kept it quite low-key.

However, I think it’s time to accept who I am now, Earlier this year, I attended my very first comic convention, the Middle East Comic Con 2015, and I was thrilled! It’s the kind of thing I would have shied away from in the past for seeming too nerdy, but it’s time to let that banner fly proudly. I’m no longer in the business of trying to impress people by putting on a ‘respectable’ front.

This, for example, is what my closet currently looks like:

IMG_20150619_153750

Yep. About three quarters of a shelf dedicated to clothes, and the rest for my assorted action figures and memorabilia. There are a few bookshelves around the house that are also guarded by my toys. I’ve got a long list of video games I intend to play this year (such as Arkham Knight, coming out Tuesday!), and there are many more collectibles that will take up more space than I can hope to provide right now.

That’s me, in a nutshell.

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3 thoughts on “Acceptance

  1. I have two boys, and they sound like you and your brother- in that one small regard. Should my younger son grow up to think thoughts like yours and be able to express himself so eloquently, I’d say it was worth it to miss the parties.

    Liked by 1 person

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